All posts by Mel

Treacherous Dunes At Whitecrest Beach In Wellfleet On Cape Cod


We took a ride up to Wellfleet to see the beaches and if they had gotten hammered by the storm last week. The sand was so high at the edge of the parking lot that you had to get out of your car to see the beach. I think that’s because they plowed all of the sand that had blown  onto the parking lot to the edge by the dunes.

There were signs at all of the beaches warning of dangerous sand dunes. At Whitecrest the sign read, “Danger Sliding Dunes.” If you look over the pile of sand, the dunes look pretty steep.


High Sands At Herring Cove Beach In Provincetown On Cape Cod


It’s a good thing they have “sand fences” along some of the beaches on Cape Cod. It’s like a snow fence, but acts the same way for sand.

I loved this photograph of this sand fence at Herring Cove Beach in Provincetown which trapped the sand so high that people were walking over it to get to the beach. I took the photograph standing on the edge of the parking lot.

And then I edited it 2 ways and I couldn’t decide which one I liked better. What do you think?

Gorgeous Sunset At Boat Meadow Last Night On Cape Cod


The sunset last night here on Cape Cod was spectacular! I saw the sky start changing color so I jumped in my car and headed over toward Boat Meadow Beach. But I stopped on side of the road over the salt marsh thinking this was just gorgeous.

Maybe the calm before the storm? We ‘re supposed to get our 3rd Nor’easter in 2 weeks on Tuesday night into Wednesday… ugh!

We are so ready for spring! What do you think?

Baltimore Oriole Nest Survives The Nor’Easter High Winds On Cape Cod


I was so surprised when I went outside the other and saw that the Baltimore Oriole’s nest from last summer was still intact and hanging from the Oak tree in our yard. Totally amazing! I can’t believe that a nest that is made hanging from a branch could still survive  in 75+ mile an hour winds when trees were falling all around them.

You can see in the 2nd photograph that the nest was woven high up in the tree, about 20 feet off of the ground. It is in the center of the photograph about 2/3s of the way up.

The Baltimore’s innate ability to weave a nest this secure is just amazing. Don’t you think?

Nauset Beach On Cape Cod After The Nor’Easter


Nauset Beach, one of the most popular beaches on Cape Cod and part of the National Seashore, has changed dramatically since the Nor’Easter last weekend. We were able to take a little walk on the beach from the trail at the end of the parking lot where the ocean went over the dune.

The first photograph is looking back at Liam’s on the left. The 2nd photograph is looking down Nauset Beach toward Chatham. It doesn’t look anything like the Nauset Beach 2 weeks ago. You can see how high the tide comes in. This is about midway between low tide and high tide.

Just totally amazing how things can change so drastically in so short a time period.

Update: We stopped at Nauset Beach yesterday afternoon and the gazebo between the parking lot and the beach has been removed.

Liam’s At Nauset Beach on Cape Cod


Liam’s at Nauset Beach was still standing yesterday when we took a ride down to Nauset Beach. They were putting up more fences around it so people would not trespass or walk on the dunes.

We drove to the end of the parking lot and took the little trail to the beach to see what it looked like. There are virtually no dunes left, and very little beach.

I walked down to the front of Liam’s and took a couple of photographs. The first one is looking up at Liam’s from the beach. The 2nd one is of the beach in front of Liam’s with all of the exposed cement structures which are in excess of 6 feet high. Someone said they were part of the septic system for the bathroom, but I have no idea. You can see the gazebo in the distance. That will have to be moved ASAP, I would think, as it is almost in the water.

We heard they would be taking Liam’s down today. We’ll take a ride later and see what is going on. 🙁

PS We just came back from Liam’s and visiting with the owner, Jon and his son, Liam. They are focusing on all of the “happy memories”from years past. I asked about the cement structures and they said they were from a 1940s septic system that is now defunct and that the town did not know they were buried there in the sand. I guess everyone was surprised to see them emerge from the deep sands!

PPS They removed the gazebo.